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2019 Harvest Season Begins!

Went out to the vanillery and was greet­ed with the sight of ripen­ing beans! You get used to the beans grow­ing for months, then all of a sudden…they’re turn­ing.

This year seems a bit ear­li­er than usu­al, but that could have been expect­ed since the 2018 flow­er­ing sea­son also start­ed ear­ly. The flow­er­ing sea­son in Hawaii starts in January and extends through June. April and May are the peak nor­mal­ly, but trips to the vanillery every morn­ing need to hap­pen for a full 6 months!

Perfectly ripe: these will be picked today!

Picking the Ripe Beans

When the beans ripen they need to be picked right away because they devel­op quick­ly once the yel­low­ing starts. We search the vanillery for ripened beans every 3 days or so to get the beans at the peak of ripeness.

Like most fruit, the sug­ar con­tent starts to go up rapid­ly in the final stages of ripen­ing. This sug­ar is in the form of glu­co­v­anillins that are the pre­cur­sor to vanillin and relat­ed aro­mat­ics. Developing these aro­mat­ics is the most impor­tant goal in pro­duc­ing vanil­la, so let­ting the sug­ars ful­ly devel­op is crit­i­cal.

We try to pick the beans when they are ful­ly ripe, but not opened at the tip. As the beans ripen, they begin to split open to even­tu­al­ly release their seeds. The beans that open are still good from a fra­grance and fla­vor stand­point, but can­not be sold as grade A or grade B as they tend to dry out too much and don’t meet the aes­thet­ic stan­dard of a grad­ed bean. Ungraded beans are used to make our own vanil­la extract. These in the pic­ture are per­fect, how­ev­er, and will prob­a­bly yield grade A beans after cur­ing.

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